stable

From King Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Chemistry
stablesta‧ble1 /ˈsteɪbəl/ ●●○ W3 AWL adjective 1 CHANGE/BECOME DIFFERENTNOT MOVINGsteady and not likely to move or change OPP unstablestability A wide base will make the structure much more stable.in a stable condition British English, in stable condition American English He is said to be in a stable condition in hospital. Children like a stable environment.2 CALMcalm, reasonable, and not easy to upset OPP unstablestability He was clearly not a very stable person.3 technicalHC a stable substance tends to stay in the same chemical or atomic state OPP unstablestably adverb
Examples from the Corpus
stableThat chair doesn't look very stable.Fuel prices have become more stable after several increases last year.In particular it seems to be required to be quiet, stable and relatively slow.But these sports are introduced against a stable background.Yet with material security and a stable culture, all of them parented more successfully than their own parents had.a stable family environmentThe mammalian gut has been stable for many millennia and acts to constrain the flexibility of E. coli's genome.a stable governmentMost people described her as a stable, intelligent woman.Given these planning parameters, one would predict a stable residential village with some river-related industrial growth.This is a very stable tent with ample room.His temperature remained stable throughout the night.in a stable conditionA nursing supervisor Monday morning said they were in stable condition.He is now in a stable condition.He was listed in stable condition.Last night the hospitals said Jason was poorly and Neil was in a stable condition.The bistable will now be in a stable condition.He was spotted by a passing motorist and is now in a stable condition in hospital.He is in stable condition in the intensive care unit at Kaiser Medical Center in Vallejo.
Related topics: Agriculture, Horses
stablestable2 ●●○ noun [countable] 1 TAa building where horses are kept2 stables3 DSHa group of racing horses that has one owner or trainer4 GROUP OF PEOPLEa group of people working for the same company or with the same trainer actors from the same Hollywood stable5 shut/close the stable door after the horse has bolted
Examples from the Corpus
stableKay Wimhurst, defending, said Zipfel had no full-time job but earned £15 helping out at stables.Old farm cart sheds, cleanly converted, do make good stables.Such horses that are locked up in stables without sensory stimulation for a long period will become permanently more anxious and fearful.There are two nearby stables for guests interested in trail rides.Ohio's football team has a talented stable of freshmen.A little girl playing the part of Mary was asked by the teacher to imagine how Mary would be feeling in the stables.When, at last, the ground closed over her, he led Gracie back to the stables.A dazzling beam of light fell through the windows that looked out to the stables.The visit to the stables is just a bonus.
Related topics: Agriculture, Horses
stablestable3 verb [transitive] TADSHto put or keep a horse in a stable
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Examples from the Corpus
stableA farm-worker who lived in the house would stable him and give him water and a handful of hay.Isn't it true that some one tried to burn down the barn your Sparrowgrass was stabled in a month ago?They stabled their horses round the back and bedded amongst dry hay with their cloaks wrapped round them.I don't want them stabling their mounts here, it'd be too conspicuous.In the beginning they stabled them at Bakehouse Farm, on the A5.Corbett reckoned horses had been stabled there within the last two or three months.
From King Business Dictionarystablesta‧ble /ˈsteɪbəl/ adjective steady and not likely to move or changeJapanese enterprises operate under relatively stable capital market conditions.The key to growth and stable employment will be through improving the international competitiveness of our companies.The Government is committed to maintaining a stable exchange rate.Origin stable1 (1200-1300) Old French estable, from Latin stabilis, from stare to stand stable2 (1200-1300) Old French estable, from Latin stabulum, from stare; STABLE1