prerequisite

From King Dictionary of Contemporary Englishprerequisitepre‧req‧ui‧site /priːˈrekwəzət/ noun [countable] formalCONDITION/something THAT MUST BE DONE something that is necessary before something else can happen or be doneprerequisite for/of/to A reasonable proficiency in English is a prerequisite for the course.
Examples from the Corpus
prerequisiteAs for relations with the public, rudeness seems almost a prerequisite of government employment.Having reliable data for the current year is, of course, a prerequisite of good budgets.Some knowledge of the French language is a prerequisite for employment there.At one time, physical presence was a prerequisite for first-hand experience.As a practical matter, a receipt showing the amount of the expense is an absolute prerequisite to substantiating a travel expense.A minimal degree of integration is therefore a functional prerequisite of society.The only important prerequisite is that there must be light: they do not thrive in dark tanks.Adequate food and shelter are the minimum prerequisites of a decent life.What are the prerequisites before counselling another human being?All too often these prerequisites were withheld, especially but not exclusively in the early stages of the Programme.prerequisite for/of/toEncryption technology is seen as a prerequisite for widespread commercial use of computer networks.A previous knowledge of computing may be of some advantage initially but is not a prerequisite for entry to the course.Therefore acid inhibition is not a prerequisite for the hyperplasia.As a practical matter, a receipt showing the amount of the expense is an absolute prerequisite to substantiating a travel expense.Urbanisation, another prerequisite for industrial growth, destroys farmland.A minimal degree of integration is therefore a functional prerequisite of society.The main prerequisite for success is old, clean water.Universities and high schools will establish literacy action as an option or prerequisite for certain students.