imply

Word family noun implication verb imply
From King Dictionary of Contemporary Englishimplyim‧ply /ɪmˈplaɪ/ ●●○ W2 AWL verb (implied, implying, implies) [transitive] 1 SUGGESTto suggest that something is true, without saying this directlyinfer, implicationimply (that) Cleo blushed. She had not meant to imply that he was lying. an implied threat2 SHOW/BE A SIGN OFif a fact, event etc implies something, it shows that it is likely to be true SYN suggestimply (that) The high level of radiation in the rocks implies that they are volcanic in origin.3 MEANINGif one thing implies another, it proves that the second thing exists Democracy implies a respect for individual liberties. High profits do not necessarily imply efficiency.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
implyAn obligation of confidence can arise through contract, either express or implied.His criticisms implied a lack of confidence in my work.Obedience did not imply approval, however.Just the fact that he's written to you implies he likes you.In discussing deviance here, no moral judgment is implied save in one respect.Free trade implies shared values.Among the ruins there are inscriptions, implying some degree of literacy even in the 9th century BC.As the examples imply, some markets are local while others are national or international in scope.But research implies something fresh about the material we obtain.You seem to be implying something that is not quite true.This implies that any differences between forward and futures prices will be inconsequential.The way he greeted the boys seemed to imply that he knew them quite well.What Polybius has in common with Cato, especially about the Roman constitution, does not necessarily imply that he read Cato.Michael did imply that I could have the job if I wanted it.The results imply that the disease originated in West Africa.This assumption implies that the forward rate is an unbiased predictor of the future spot rate.The article implied that unemployed people are lazy and do not want to work.Many prisoners' arms and legs have been broken, implying torture.imply (that)A problem to note is that high-tech implies high costs.They are, in a very restricted sense: decreasing ray average costs or increasing returns to scale imply ray subadditivity.I do not imply some teleological goal-seeking or the existence of a great designer with an aim in mind.The answer to the previous question implies that both curves are indeed monotonic. 3.The press leapt to charge him with hypocrisy, implying that he actually believed in this behavior.The salesmen only implied that the cars were safe.As the name implies, the bond relies on a crystalline post within its matrix.Are you implying the fault is with California, for coming up with these silly strict laws?Sharing a film with a third party, it implied, was tantamount to infidelity.imply (that)A problem to note is that high-tech implies high costs.They are, in a very restricted sense: decreasing ray average costs or increasing returns to scale imply ray subadditivity.I do not imply some teleological goal-seeking or the existence of a great designer with an aim in mind.The answer to the previous question implies that both curves are indeed monotonic. 3.The press leapt to charge him with hypocrisy, implying that he actually believed in this behavior.As the name implies, the bond relies on a crystalline post within its matrix.Are you implying the fault is with California, for coming up with these silly strict laws?Sharing a film with a third party, it implied, was tantamount to infidelity.
Origin imply (1300-1400) Old French emplier, from Latin implicare; IMPLICATE